SAVE THE VAQUITA


FEWER THAN 20 REMAIN IN THE WILD!

IT’S THE SMALLEST PORPOISE & MOST ENDANGERED MARINE MAMMAL IN THE WORLD!


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The vaquita is a small porpoise found only in the northern Gulf of California (Sea of Cortez) in Mexico. 

Vaquitas tend to live in shallow turbid or murky waters, because they have high nutrient content. This in turn attracts small fish, squid, shrimp, and other crustaceans on which they feed.

The vaquita is found only in a small area of the world. Once this population of marine mammals goes extinct, the entire species goes extinct.

The vaquita is found only in a small area of the world. Once this population of marine mammals goes extinct, the entire species goes extinct.

The Vaquita’s territory overlaps with commercial fisheries in Mexico that catch shrimp, curvina, chano and sierra, as well as illegal fishing operations that targets the equally endangered totoaba fish.

The primary threat to vaquitas is entanglement in fishing gear.


What can people in New Jersey or in the United States do to help save the vaquita?

**Please Boycott Shrimp from Mexico!**

Shrimp has been the most consumed seafood in the United States since 2001, followed by canned tuna and salmon. 

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The demand for shrimp in the United States is high. On average, one billion pounds of shrimp are eaten every year by Americans.

No one country can satisfy the huge desire the American people have for shrimp, especially inexpensive or cheap shrimp. As a result, the United States imports massive amounts (over 90%) of shrimp every year from developing countries, including Mexico.

WHY SHOULD PEOPLE BOYCOTT MEXICAN SHRIMP?

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Mexican shrimp is an important and lucrative export product to the United States, which is the leading buyer. In 2016, the United States imported millions of tons of shrimp from Mexico valued at more than $274 million. The shrimp industry played a primary role in the vaquita's decline over several decades, and a boycott of all Mexican shrimp is urgently required to compel the industry to help save the animal. A boycott will encourage the industry to demand that the Mexican government significantly expand its efforts to save the vaquita. While not all Mexican shrimp products come from the Gulf of California, only by boycotting all Mexican shrimp is the industry likely to help save the vaquita. 

HOW DO I KNOW IF SHRIMP IN MY SUPERMARKET OR ON A RESTAURANT MENU IS FROM MEXICO?

Seafood products sold in supermarkets must include the country of origin on the product packaging. If you can't find this information on the packaging, ask store personnel to determine the country of origin of the product. In a restaurant, ask your server about the country of origin of any shrimp item on the menu and, if they won't or can't answer your question, then order another menu item. If you see shrimp at workplace and college cafeterias, please ask the food service manager about the origin of the product. Refer store personnel, servers, and service managers to the BoycottMexicanShrimp.com website if they have questions.

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The primary threat to vaquitas is entanglement in fishing gear.

PLEASE boycot shrimp from mexico.

CLICK ON THE IMAGES BELOW OR WATCH THE VIDEO TO FIND OUT HOW TO HELP.

 
 
 
 
 

Learn more about the plight of the Vaquita by reading:

Vaquita: Science, Politics, and Crime in the Sea of Cortez, by Brooke Bessesen, Island Press, 2018.